About

Drew Sutherland loves singing to the audience and telling a story with his music. He is a strong believer that music is a universal emotional language that allows individuals to escape reality. With our constant moving lives, we can never allow our mind to relax and be set free.

He is currently a freelance musician in the DFW and Houston, TX areas. He is one of the founding members of the Avenue C trombone quartet. The quartet went on a four-day tour through Kansas and finished the tour as guest artists at the Washburn University trombone day. Shortly after their tour they were one of the featured recitals at the 2014 Big 12 Trombone Conference.

Drew has also recently started his own travel recording service. In May he will be producing his first cd with his friend Chris Sharpe.

Since those halcyon days of middle school band, he has gone on to earn his Bachelor of Music in Trombone Performance from Idaho State University, a Master of Music in Trombone Performance and Pedagogy from Oklahoma State University, and is currently working on his Doctor of Musical Arts in Trombone Performance from the University of North Texas under the tutelage of Natalie Mannix. He has been a teaching fellow at UNT since 2013. He performs with the Center Brass Quintet, the North Texas Trombone Consortium, the University of North Texas Symphonic Band, and on his free time he works as a maintenance man for Cumberland Presbyterian Children’s Home in Denton, Texas.

Drew Sutherland is a native of Pocatello, Idaho and has been playing trombone since the age of 12, when his middle school made him choose between playing an instrument and singing. An avid outdoorsman from an early age, he was more interested in playing outside than paying attention to school, but ultimately chose trombone over choir.

He loves mountain biking, hiking, camping, and backpacking. He loves backpacking in Montana, Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. He is happiest playing trombone, wearing suits, and trying to convince others that winter camping in Oklahoma really isn’t that bad once you get used to it.